Federal Realty Signs Tech Innovator United Solutions to North Bethesda Office

909 Rose Avenue

909 ROSE AVENUE PHOTO: BY FEDERAL REALTY INVESTMENT TRUST

From Commercial Observer

Tech company United Solutions has signed a 20,602-square-foot lease to take the top floor at 909 Rose Avenue, a 212,000-square-foot office building in the Pike & Rose neighborhood of North Bethesda, Md., with landlord Federal Realty Investment Trust

Rockville, Md.-based United Solutions, which offers technological products involving blockchain, artificial intelligence and automation, plans to move into the building this winter.

“We are grateful for the opportunities we have had with our federal government partners and organizations around the world, to help them realize the power of cutting edge technologies to reinvent businesses and protect workforces,” David Nguyen, United Solutions’ founder and CEO, said in a release. “Our success has enabled us to expand our reach, and subsequently, expand our workforce. We look forward to growing in a state-of-the-art space and amenity rich neighborhood that will enhance employee morale, recruiting and engagement.” 

Federal Realty opened the 11-story, LEED Gold-certified office building last summer, and moved its own headquarters into the second and third floors. Earlier this year, workplace provider Industrious signed a 42,768-square-foot lease in the same building. OneDigital is also currently in the building, which is now two-thirds leased.

The building features contactless entry throughout the parking garage, lobby and elevators, and an HVAC system that meets enhanced health and safety standards. It also offers outside air filtered to levels appropriate for general surgery rooms.

“Federal is committed to getting people back to work safely, in dynamic buildings with advanced health and wellness attributes, such as 909 Rose,” James Milam, Federal Realty’s senior vice president, said. 

909 Rose is part of the 24-acre, transit-oriented Pike & Rose neighborhood that Federal Realty is developing. It includes a residential component as well as dining and entertainment options. 

An update on coronavirus and vaccinations in Montgomery County

There’s encouraging news on Covid here in the county.

  • County transmission rates, the lowest since early Nov., featured a 14-day average test positivity rate below 4%; and a sharply declining 7-day average over the past five weeks (below 11 per 100,000 residents, as of Feb. 22).
  • Over 12% of county residents, including nearly half of those age 75+, have received at least one vaccine dose; as have two-thirds of the 9,000 staff who were prioritized by Montgomery County Public Schools.
  • Indoor dining resumed Feb. 14 at 25% capacity, and enforcement patrols
    reported no violations.

This report also includes a comprehensive guide to vaccinations in the county.

And as a bonus, here are the slides from Governor Hogan’s recent press conference.

Well done, WJ!

On NBC: Walter Johnson Students Help Others Cope During the Pandemic

Four Walter Johnson students noticed the cracks forming in the lives of their peers during a year of distance-learning and created a remarkable safe space online. FED-UP WJ helps students reconnect with each other through Zoom meet-ups where students can talk things out.

Watch the news story: https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/changing-minds/montgomery-county-students-help-others-cope-during-the-pandemic/257803

Enjoy these pics of Bark Social — it’s almost here

Courtesy of Robert Dyer

The expected February 26, 2021 opening date of Bark Social is rapidly approaching at Pike & Rose. Construction of the dog park and craft beer and wine bar has advanced accordingly. More of the shipping container structures have been completed, and the lights are on inside. Branded logos have been applied to the sides of the containers, including a dog drinking from a glass of beer.

Washington ranks #2 in walkable urbanism; Maryland and Virginia outshine other cities’ suburbs

From Greater Greater Washington

The Washington region is second in the nation in having housing and jobs in walkable places, a new report says. A real stand-out for our region, compared to other similar cities, are the walkable places even outside the center city like Silver Spring and Reston.

The report, by Christopher Leinberger and Michael Rodriguez from the George Washington University School of Business, ranks the US’s 30 largest metropolitan areas based on their “WalkUPs,” or “walkable urban places.”

Friends of White Flint looks forward to the day when the Pike District makes the list of walkable places.

Covid is waning and indoor dining is back

Montgomery County’s seven-day average of COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents has fallen to its lowest level since November 5, when it was 14.8. As of Monday, the county’s seven-day average was 15.1 cases per 100,000 residents, down from a peak average of 49.8 cases per 100,000 residents on January 12.

Based on these metrics, combined with 10.2 percent of all residents receiving their first vaccination shot, the Council voted last week to allow indoor dining at a 25% capacity. Patrons may stay in a restaurant for 90 minutes, an increase from the originally proposed 60 minutes.

If you’ve been missing dining inside a restaurant … or if your preference is to only eat outside and/or by takeout … you can get info on old favorites or learn about a new restaurant at:

https://pikedistrict.org/dine and https://visitmontgomery.com/moco-eats/

Defining the 15-minute city

Can the Pike District be a 15-minute city? Should the Pike District be a 15-minute city?

From CNU

The 15-minute city is defined by its ability to provide access to all human needs by walking or bicycling for a quarter hour or less. Transit should be provided within the 15-minute city, but cannot accurately define its scale.

When an urban area achieves the 15-minute city goal, several positive implications follow:

  • It is socioeconomically equitable—those without a car could easily access all their needs.
  • The area is small enough that measuring diversity, in balance, produces a useful indicator. In larger geographic areas, diversity has less meaning because many human needs could be too distant to be easily accessible anyway.
  • The need for transportation is minimized—and therefore the reduction in fuel mitigates global warming.
  • Human-powered transportation, which improves health and well-being, is promoted.
  • The convenient location of services, accessible by multiple modes, saves time and improves quality of life.

The 15-minute city implies three levels of sheds:

  1. The 5-minute walk shed, a quarter-mile from center to edge, indicating the individual neighborhood. Each quarter-mile shed must have ordinary daily needs, a range of housing types, and a center (generally a public square or main street with minimal mixed use). Small businesses, at least, are located in the neighborhood.
  2. A 15-minute walk shed, three-quarters of a mile from center to edge, is the maximum distance that most people are going to walk. Within this shed should be located a full mix of uses, including a grocery store, pharmacy, general merchandise, and public schools. Larger parks that serve multiple neighborhoods will be found here, in addition to larger employers—but not necessarily the region’s biggest. The 15-minute walk shed provides access to regional transit—at least one station. This shed is similar in size to a 5-minute bicycle shed, and the bicycle can be used to transport purchased goods. The shed provides for weekly and daily needs. .
  3. The 15-minute bicycle shed would give access to major cultural, medical, and higher education facilities. Regional parks and major employers can be found here. Access to intercity transit may be available. This shed provides access to special needs. The total extent of the 15-minute city is therefore defined by the three-mile radius of the 15-minute bike ride.

Read the rest of the article here and learn more about the 15-minute city.

The intersection of Old Georgetown Road and Executive Blvd. will be closing in March

MCDOT has announced they will be closing the intersection of Old Georgetown Road and Executive Blvd. in early March to speed up completion of the Western Workaround project and ensure the safety of construction workers.

The detour plan can be found on the map below (which I know is a bit fuzzy) and also here. MCDOT plans to have signage directing people along the detour routes. MCDOT will soon share their plans for pedestrian and bicycle access as well as a better detour map.

Prior to the intersection closure, MCDOT and its prime contractor will ensure that the new section of Grand Park Avenue between Old Georgetown Road and Banneker Avenue is open to traffic. In addition, the scheduled improvements along Executive Blvd. between Nicholson Lane and Banneker Avenue will be completed before the intersection closure. 

Work hours will be from 6:00 am until 10:00 pm Monday through Friday. N0 overnight shift is planned at this time. The intersection will be closed for about five months.

MCDOT is planning outreach to the businesses and residents who live and work near this intersection. If you have questions or concerns about this closure, you can ask Marcelo Cortez, Chief, Transportation Construction Section, MCDOT, Division of Transportation Engineering at R.Marcelo.Cortez@montgomerycountymd.gov .

Draft Climate Action Plan

In December 2020, County Executive Marc Elrich released the Draft Climate Action Plan  for public review. The Climate Action Plan is Montgomery County’s strategic plan to cut greenhouse gas emissions 80% by 2027 and 100% by 2035.

The Climate Action Plan details the effects of a changing climate on Montgomery County and includes strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and climate-related risks to the County’s residents, businesses, and the built and natural environment. After receiving community input on the Draft Climate Action Plan, the County plans to finalize the Plan in Spring 2021.

You can learn more about the plan at a virtual event.

The County is accepting comments on this plan through the end of February.

Gather your gal pals for an hour full of facials and girl talk with Woodhouse Day Spa at NoBe Market’s Galentine’s Day Virtual Spa on February 13th at 1:00pm EST!

You and your girlfriends can join for a brunch and facial class combo! Woodhouse Day Spa’s Lead Esthetician, Michelle will lead you through a step-by-step facial, including prepping your very own seaweed mask and a demonstration of correct facial acupressure massage techniques! Each attendee will receive a facial starter kit by VOYA Organic Beauty filled with certified organic and hand-harvested seaweed skincare. Facial Kit Includes:
– Cleanser
– Exfoliation and light peel
– Seaweed Mask
– Toner
– Serums
– Eye Cream
– Moisturizer

Facial kits will be available to pick-up from Woodhouse Day Spa [during business hours] starting February 10th until the day of the event. Woodhouse Day Spa will also be adding in a few more goodies like a sleep mask and hair ties, for all your Galentine’s day needs! In addition, Woodhouse Day Spa will also be adding in a $20 off coupon to use at your next visit with them!

Want to level up your Brunch Virtual Facial at home? Visit NoBe Market’s Instagram for wine and rosé recommendations from Hop N Grape and at-home cocktail recipes or skip the ingredient list grocery visit by ordering chilled to-go cocktails and brunch menu items from Seasons52.