Friends of White Flint

Promoting a Sustainable, Walkable and Engaging Community

P.O. Box 2761

White Flint Station

Kensington, MD 20891

Phone: 301-980-3768

Email: info@whiteflint.org


Can Wall Park become more than a parking lot?

Posted on by dan reed!

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Wednesday night, representatives from Montgomery Parks led a community discussion about how to renovate Wall Park. While some residents were concerned about losing parking spaces and impacts to the Kennedy Shriver Aquatic Center, others were excited about the park’s potential.

Residents vote for things they'd like to see at Wall Park. Photo by the author.

Residents vote for things they’d like to see at Wall Park. Photo by the author.

Today, the 11-acre park is home to the Shriver Aquatic Center, a small playground, a stand of trees, and a big parking lot. Planning for a new Wall Park began with the White Flint Sector Plan in 2010, which recommended making it a major outdoor gathering place.

From a parking lot to a “great lawn”

The renovation of Wall Park would happen over two phases. First, the parking lot would become what Montgomery Parks project coordinator Rachel Davis Newhouse called a “great lawn” with space for events, festivals, and smaller, informal gatherings. Developer Gables Residential would build a new, 900-space parking garage behind the aquatic center in conjunction with an apartment complex they plan to build on a property just north of the park.

The parking lot at Wall Park could become more green space. Image from Montgomery Parks.

400 of the spaces would be set aside for park and aquatic center users, compared to 260 spaces today. Accessible parking and the drop-off loop would stay where they are now.

“It just makes sense to build that all as one parking structure,” Newhouse said. “You save money to do all that at once and then it’s done.”

In the second phase, the park would be fully built out as a regional outdoor destination. The “great lawn” could get a stage and a small amphitheatre, allowing it to host live performances. Movable seating, shelters and picnic areas, could accommodate smaller gatherings.

There could also be a number of new additions, including an expanded playground, a skate park, a dog park, and a “splash zone” similar to the fountains in downtown Silver Spring and Rockville Town Square. Newhouse is also exploring food and drink options, like a park cafe and food trucks. And a “walkway to freedom” would connect the park to Josiah Henson Park, located across Old Georgetown Road, with interpretive signage and a museum kiosk.

Meanwhile, the Recreation Department wants to expand the 44,000-square-foot aquatic center, which is already the county’s busiest pool. Officials are also considering building a new recreation center alongside it, noting that the nearest facilities are the Bauer Drive Recreation Center in Rockville and the Jane Lawton Recreation Center in Chevy Chase, both of which are five miles away.

“Rather than building new, freestanding recreation centers, we’re trying to take advantage of what we already have,” says Gabe Albornoz, director of the Montgomery County Department of Recreation. The new facilities would wrap around the existing aquatic center. Albornoz expects that construction would last about 18 to 24 months, which may disrupt activities at the aquatic center.

Concerns about losing parking, safety

Newhouse gave everyone stickers, asking them to vote on what they’d like to see in the park. But many people in attendance said they didn’t want anything at all. Residents had concerns about construction disrupting the aquatic center, traffic from new park visitors, and the “environmental impacts” of removing the parking lot.

gables typical upper level plan

Plan of the proposed Gables apartment complex, including the parking garage it’ll share with Wall Park. Image from Gables.

Meanwhile, several parents of swimmers at the aquatic center worried about the loss of free parking and safety in the parking garage. One parent who lives “one mile away” in Luxmanor said she drives her kids to and from Shriver “8 times a day, 7 days a week.”

“I’m tired of parking being taken away,” she said. “I don’t want to be here anymore. I don’t go to Bethesda, I don’t go to Rockville. It’s not fun sitting in traffic.”

Albornoz insisted that the parking would be free for aquatic center visitors, perhaps by using validated tickets, like at the Rockville Library. He also said that the aquatic center could add a second, rear entrance to the aquatic center to reduce the walk from the parking garage.

Paul Meyer, member of the White Flint Downtown Advisory Committee, proposed a covered, lighted walkway similar to the one between the Music Center at Strathmore and the parking garage at the Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro station. “Nothing’s totally safe, but you can make it pretty safe,” Meyer said.

“We need this kind of amenity”

Meyer noted that several thousand new homes are being built in White Flint and will need amenities to serve them, like those proposed at Wall Park. Meanwhile, the developers of those new homes are being taxed to pay for those amenities. “I think we’re thinking of this as a single property,” he said. “It’s a piece of a puzzle. A small piece.”

One resident of the Georgetown Village condominium says that the park will give kids in White Flint much-needed places to play. “We’ve been fighting tooth and nail for more playgrounds,” he said. “We need this kind of amenity . . . I know people are frustrated with a lot of aspects of this, but I’m looking forward to it. It can’t be built fast enough.”

There are still a lot of questions with the Wall Park plan. There’s no cost estimate yet, and there’s no final design, so it’s unclear how the aquatic center will be affected during construction.

But that’s no reason for people to automatically reject the idea of making a better park, especially one that will benefit many people in White Flint. People often complain there isn’t enough open space in Montgomery County’s urban areas, and renovating Wall Park is an opportunity to create more of it.

The Montgomery County Planning Board will review a preliminary concept for Wall Park in conjunction with designs for the Gables project at a meeting on Thursday, October 24. Depending on when the Western Workaround gets built, construction on the parking garage and apartments could start by “mid-2015 at best,” according to Eddie Meder, development associate at Gables Residential, meaning that work on the park could soon follow.

4 Responses to Can Wall Park become more than a parking lot?

Elnigma says: September 20, 2013 at 12:42 pm

I’m happy to see the words “new parking garage” and plans for an actual park. Taking in consideration parking needs and other driving necessities is really important. Also pleased at playground, water feature plans. Consider places for adults to sit and possibly a wi-fi hub. and I think you’d have instant success. :)

Skeptical says: September 23, 2013 at 10:15 pm

So what is going on here is the developer is agreeing to make a somewhat bigger parking garage in exchange for a big new park being built right next to its development, which of course makes its development more valuable. There is no something for nothing.

And along the way they take a functioning recreational facility that serves literally hundreds of people a day, keeps kids away from video games and everything else, and degrades it.

One hopes that our parks department has the good sense to at least demand and get, paid for by the developer, a major renovation to the KSAC so that the (or at least an) entrance is directly across from the garage. Forcing people to walk around the building is dangerous and absurd.

The county has more leverage here than it thinks.

Lindsay Hoffman says: September 24, 2013 at 8:46 am

I have to say, I disagree. The county is proposing an enlarged and improved aquatic center, recreation facility and greenspace that will top anything currently found in the county and will result in serving even more people with greater diversity than it presently does. At the moment, the existing Aquatic Center doesn’t have the breadth of the recreation facility they’re proposing. But, in order to make it happen, the surface parking lot has to go. This is valuable space that can be used for many other purposes – which is why we’re seeing surface parking replaced with garages all over the world. And, to be clear, the county will be paying for the portion of the garage that will accommodate the public’s cars. Ensuring that it’s large enough to accommodate both purposes has been the plan from the beginning. Search “Wall Park” on our blog for more background and some images, as well!

Skeptic says: September 26, 2013 at 10:17 am

The supposed enlarged MAC facility is conceptual and unfunded. Changing the parking is entirely unnecessary for it to happen. The purpose of removing the parking is to do the lawn thing.

This is not my conjecture, this is what the people at the meeting said- the ones promoting the garage.

In any event, integrating the parking with the aquatic center should be an absolute requirement for the county to go through with this.

I do tend to agree with you that the governmental push toward denser development does tend to doom surface parking lots for better or for worse. But making an existing well utilized facility less useful is not a very good trade off in my opinion, especially if it could be done right as it could here.