Category Montgomery County Government

Redistricting Montgomery County

As you can see below, the redistricting committee had voted to put North Bethesda with Silver Spring and Takoma Park in their proposed redistricting map. On first glance, we think that North Bethesda is not well-served by being part of the Silver Spring district. Stay tuned for more info, including what you can do to advocate for different options.

Yes, we know it’s fuzzy, but it’s the map we have right now. We’re working on getting you a better one.

From Montgomery County Media

Members of the Redistricting Commission voted 6-5 for the map it will send to the county council recommending how to divide the county into new districts.

The map divides Montgomery County into seven districts each of which can elect one council member and one at-large council member. The map stands as a revision of one presented last week when the commission narrowed its choices to three maps as the county moves to add two additional council seats. During a meeting Wednesday, Commissioner David Stein said changes reflect input from commissioners as well as the public.

The Commission must now write a report for the county council. Members will meet next on Nov. 3 to vote on a final report and map to deliver to the council by Nov. 5.

District 1 includes Chevy Chase, Bethesda, Potomac, and Travilah.

District 2 is exclusively upcounty; it contains all of North Potomac, all of Germantown, and includes Clarksburg.

District 3 is in east county and would be a plurality African American district. It starts at the Beltway around Four Corners, goes up to Burtonsville and up to the top of Cloverly, Spencerville, and Colesville.

District 4 includes Rockville and Gaithersburg. The commission voted to keep the cities together.

District 5 is the Silver Spring district. It includes Silver Spring/Long Branch and Takoma Park, extending up to North Bethesda.

District 6 is the Wheaton district; it starts in Forest Glen and includes all of Wheaton, the entire Glenmont district, and goes up through Aspen Hill into Derwood.

District 7 is the upcounty/midcounty district. It includes Olney, Montgomery Village and continues all the way into Damascus.

Stein said six districts are majority people of color. The revised map moved part of Chevy Chase from the Silver Spring district into the Bethesda district, resulting in the Silver Spring district going from Takoma Park up to North Bethesda. The Wheaton district therefore loses North Bethesda and extends up to Derwood, Stein said. The Hispanic population and voting-age population of the Wheaton district increases to become a plurality. The upcounty/midcounty district has more upcounty representation by adding in areas around Damascus. Some upcounty community concerns were addressed, so Germantown and North Potomac are no longer split, Stein said.

Pike District Streetscape Design Guidelines Community Meeting

Thursday, October 21, 2021 7:00pm to 8:00pm

The Montgomery County Planning Department, part of the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC), will partner with the Friends of White Flint to host a virtual meeting to review the Pike District Streetscape Guidelines on Thursday, October 21 from 7 to 8 p.m. These guidelines will complement the Pike District’s existing high-quality streetscape and mixed-use developments that have been constructed since the adoption of the White Flint Sector Plan in 2010 and will provide direction to future developments. The guidelines are being produced as part of the Advancing the Pike District initiative, which is sparking implementation of the White Flint Sector Plan by identifying short-term development opportunities  that can be implemented within the next two to five years. RSVPs are required to attend the meeting.

Event details:
Montgomery Planning and Friends of White Flint host the Advancing the Pike District Streetscape Guidelines virtual meeting October 21, 2021 7 to 8 p.m. Click here to RVSP to the meeting.

Pike District Connector

The Montgomery County Planning Department partnered with the Montgomery County Department of Transportation, Montgomery Parks, and the Better Block Foundation to temporarily connect the Bethesda Trolley Trail to the Montrose Parkway Trail and activate hubs at key intersections along the trail connection. The project, called the Pike District Connector, was built with community volunteers and included a kickoff community bike ride with the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) on September 18. The Connector will remain in place through late fall 2021.

About Advancing the Pike District

Advancing the Pike District is a Montgomery Planning initiative to accelerate the transformation of White Flint’s core into a walkable, mixed-use district by identifying short- and medium-term implementation-focused solutions that build on the Sector Plan’s recommendations, enhance mobility, and promote economic development, urban design and placemaking. The project revisits and builds upon the recommendations from the 2010 White Flint Sector Plan, which has guided infrastructure improvements and development in the White Flint area over the past decade, with the goal of accelerating White Flint’s transformation.

View the Advancing the Pike District Development Trends, Infrastructure Update and Short-Term Solutions report.

For more information about Advancing the Pike District, contact Walker Freer at 301-495-4651 or by email. Sign up for the project’s eletter to stay informed.

Community invited to attend virtual meeting for Advancing Pike District Streetscape Guidelines on October 21

The Montgomery County Planning Department, part of the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC), will partner with the Friends of White Flint to host a virtual meeting to review the Pike District Streetscape Guidelines on Thursday, October 21 from 7 to 8 p.m. These guidelines will complement the Pike District’s existing high-quality streetscape and mixed-use developments that have been constructed since the adoption of the White Flint Sector Plan in 2010 and will provide direction to future developments. The guidelines are being produced as part of the Advancing the Pike District initiative, which is sparking implementation of the White Flint Sector Plan by identifying short-term development opportunities  that can be implemented within the next two to five years. RSVPs are required to attend the meeting.

Event details:
Montgomery Planning and Friends of White Flint host the Advancing the Pike District Streetscape Guidelines virtual meeting October 21, 2021 7 to 8 p.m.
RVSP

Pike District Connector

The Montgomery County Planning Department partnered with the Montgomery County Department of Transportation, Montgomery Parks, and the Better Block Foundation to temporarily connect the Bethesda Trolley Trail to the Montrose Parkway Trail and activate hubs at key intersections along the trail connection. The project, called the Pike District Connector, was built with community volunteers and included a kickoff community bike ride with the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) on September 18. The Connector will remain in place through late fall 2021.

About Advancing the Pike District

Advancing the Pike District is a Montgomery Planning initiative to accelerate the transformation of White Flint’s core into a walkable, mixed-use district by identifying short- and medium-term implementation-focused solutions that build on the Sector Plan’s recommendations, enhance mobility, and promote economic development, urban design and placemaking. The project revisits and builds upon the recommendations from the 2010 White Flint Sector Plan, which has guided infrastructure improvements and development in the White Flint area over the past decade, with the goal of accelerating White Flint’s transformation.

View the Advancing the Pike District Development Trends, Infrastructure Update and Short-Term Solutions report.

For more information about Advancing the Pike District, contact Walker Freer at 301-495-4651 or by email. Sign up for the project’s eletter to stay informed.

BCC Regional Services Center FY23 Budget Forum

Virtual and at the RSC Tuesday, October 5, 2021, 7pm
In-person (limited seating):B-CC RSC 4805 Edgemoor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814

Online – Virtual – Click HERE Downloading or special software is not needed – just click.

The Citizens Advisory Board Welcomes County Executive Marc Elrich and the Management and Budget Staff

AGENDA

Welcome & Introduction• Pete Fosselman, Director, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Regional Services Center
Welcome Remarks• Kristen Nelson, Chair, Western Montgomery County Citizens Advisory Board
Presentation – Office of Management and Budget on the Process and Current Fiscal Climate• Office of Management and Budget
Remarks – County Executive Elrich
Community Comments and Questions
Closing – County Executive Elrich
Adjourn

Friedson to run for re-election to Montgomery County Council

From Bethesda Beat

Montgomery County Council Member Andrew Friedson announced on Wednesday that he plans to run for re-election to his District 1 seat.

Friedson, 35, was first elected in 2018. He said he wants to spend his second term focused on “building on the work we’ve started” in the past four years enhancing residents’ quality of life, creating a more competitive local economy, improving housing affordability and honing the county’s focus on fiscal responsibility.

During his first term, Friedson, a Democrat, was a consistent advocate for fiscal responsibility within the county government, sponsoring a bill that requires an “economic impact statement” for all new county legislation. He also pushed for regular financial reviews of county agencies, monetary relief programs for residents during the COVID-19 pandemic and strengthening county ethics laws.

Friedson grew up in Montgomery County, and graduated from Winston Churchill High School in Potomac.

Read the rest of the story here.

Analyzing the future of mixed-use development in Montgomery County

Montgomery County has allowed mixed-use development in buildings around activity centers for many years with the goal of creating interactive streets, providing meaningful public spaces, and creating communities where people can live, work, shop, and play within a given neighborhood. Numerous studies show that mixed-use districts generate higher real estate value, reduced vehicle miles traveled, and higher transit ridership.

new study by Montgomery Planning’s Research and Strategic Projects (RSP) Division has found that mixed-use development projects are likely to become even more common than single-use projects both locally and nationally. Considering there is only about 15 percent of “unconstrained” land available for development or re-development in the county, mixed-use properties are needed to support our future economic and population growth. Learn more through an interview with the project manager of the Montgomery County Mixed-use Development Study, Research Planner Nicholas Holdzkom, in the latest Third Place blog post.

Road Closure: Randolph Road Westbound Lanes Close Starting Today

The westbound lanes of Randolph Road between Nebel Street and Parklawn Drive will close starting today, August 30, to make way for Pepco construction.

The westbound lanes of Randolph Road between Nebel Street and Parklawn Drive will be closed starting Monday, as Pepco begins construction for a new substation. The eastbound lanes will remain open, and businesses on the westbound side will be open — as will the sidewalks.

The substation will supply power to the Bethesda and White Flint area, according to a Montgomery County news release. The construction is expected to last 6 months, it said.

“Substation work started in 2020 and associated line work will be performed with overhead and underground construction along Nebel Street, Marinelli Road, Old Georgetown Road, Citadel Avenue, Randolph Road, and Parklawn Drive,” the county’s news release says. “The substation project is expected to be completed by December 2023.”

Reopening date for Old Georgetown Rd. and Executive Blvd.

From MCDOT

Due to weather impacts and a break down at the asphalt plant, the re-opening of the intersection at Old Georgetown Road and Executive Boulevard is re-scheduled for Tuesday August 31.   The final lift of hot mix asphalt on Old Georgetown Road northbound was being placed when the asphalt plant broke down. The contractor will resume asphalt work on Friday Aug. 27th pending the repair at the plant and possibly Saturday asphalt work will be needed. The pavement marking work has been rescheduled for 8/30/21. The sign work (uncovering) and removal of the detour signs is rescheduled for Tuesday, 8/31/21.  The traffic signals at Old Georgetown Road and Executive Boulevard will be set for operation on Tuesday, 8/31/21. All the variable message signs will be changed to the new date “On or about 8/31/21 MD 187, New Traffic Pattern”.   Please reach out to me or our project team if you have any questions.  Your continued patience during construction is appreciated.  

Based on the current weather predictions and a re-opening of the asphalt plant, the anticipated re-opening date for the intersection of Old Georgetown Road and Executive Boulevard is on or about Tuesday August 31st

Our testimony to County Council on Thrive Montgomery 2050

Good evening. I’m Amy Ginsburg, Executive Director of Friends of White Flint, a nonprofit devoted to transforming the Pike District/North Bethesda area into a walkable, transit-oriented, thriving community.

If you think that sounds like the goal of the Thrive Montgomery 2050 Plan, you’re right. Much of the Thrive Montgomery plan matches the goals of the two White Flint Sector plans, and we applaud its focus on sustainable growth, development, and urbanism.

We agree wholeheartedly that the major objective of this plan is to ensure a vibrant, strong and competitive economy by attracting and maintaining major employers, enhancing our federal campuses, supporting small businesses and innovation, and attracting and retaining a high-quality, diverse workforce.  It is essential to recognize that attracting high-quality jobs to areas like the Pike District is the key to transforming North Bethesda and other areas of the county.

We also support its emphasis on achieving vision zero, developing a robust network for walking and biking, and utilizing parks as gathering spaces for social connection. As Thrive Montgomery proposes, planning for people, not cars, is the key to redeveloping the Pike District. Being able to easily walk or bike to meet most daily needs creates dynamic centers that contain many different types of housing and high-quality jobs as well as the shops, restaurants, parks, and other amenities that are vital to a community like the Pike District.

We support the Thrive Montgomery 2050 plan because it matches the goals of the White Flint sector plans – creating diverse living spaces, enhancing social interaction, and attracting the high-quality jobs which are the foundation of a thriving community.